Miranda rights and why the police don’t always read them

   

Miranda rights are the rights given to criminal suspects in the U.S. upon arrest informing them of certain rights before asking them any questions. The wording that is commonly used in a Miranda warning is, “You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say can and will be used against you in a court of law. You have the right to an attorney. If you cannot afford an attorney, one will be provided for you.” The Miranda warning primarily serves to protect suspects from self-incrimination, but not being arrested. The Miranda warning is given by the police officer when the suspect is in custody and under interrogation. The reading of these rights is a safeguard because placing a person under custody is likely to undermine a person’s will to resist and may compel them to speak in a self-incriminating way.     

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